THE REFORMATION

The Reformation window has as its main theme the conversion of St. Paul. The man who was later to become an apostle is shown at the moment of his soul-stirring experience when suddenly there shined round about him a light from heaven, and he fell to the earth, and heard a voice saying unto him, "Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou Me?” (Acts 9: 34) Amazement, wonder, and dread are de- picted in the face of Saul, who later came to be known as Paul, and he attempts to shield himself from the blinding light. In one hand he carries a sword, symbolic of the fact that he was on his way to Damascus, breathing out threatening and slaughter against the disciples of the Lord (Acts 9: 1), but also of his great words: “Take unto you the whole armor of God, that ye may be able to withstand in the evil day and, having done all, to stand ... taking the shield of faith ... the helmet of salvation and the sword of the Spirit, which is the Word of God.” (Ephesians 6: 13) In the upper right lancet is the risen and ascended Lord, who called upon Paul to be His follower.

Centuries later the light of the Gospel truth was revealed to people who learned through patient study of God’s Holy Word that “the righteous shall live by faith.” The Gospel was rediscovered, and the great work of the Reformation was begun. In the lower left lancet, a castle-fortress reminds us of Martin Luther's stirring hymn, “A Mighty Fortress Is Our God.” Superimposed on the castle is a parchment, symbolizing the famous 95 Theses which were nailed to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg on October 31, 1517. The appearance of the Theses was the trumpet-blast that heralded the coming of the Reformation,

In the lower right lancet, the figure of Luther is shown as he stands before the emperor at Worms and fearlessly says, “My conscience is captive to the Word of God. I cannot and will not recant anything, for to go against conscience is neither right nor safe. Here I stand, I cannot do otherwise. God help me. Amen.”

Our Evangelical and Reformed Church pays tribute not only to the spiritual insight of Martin Luther, but to all those heroic people of God who believed in the cardinal principles of Protestantism: the right of private judgment by the inspired and enlightened individual, justification by faith, the supreme authority of Scripture, and the universal priesthood of all believers. For that reason there is included in the Reformation window the portraits of the spiritual giants Calvin, Zwingli, and Melanchthon. The Evangelical and Reformed Church recognizes the contribution made by sincere men and women of all Christian denominations, and the words inscribed in the window have a deep meaning for us: “In essentials unity, in non-essentials liberty, in all things charity.”

High in the left lancet is the symbol of the World Council of Churches with the Greek word “Oikoumene,” signifying our longing for understanding and unity among Christians.

 

Worship Times

Sunday Morning

To help prevent the spread
of the coronavirus,
we're worshiping online
for the time being.
We invite you to join
our live-streamed service.

We look forward
to returning to
our normal schedule,
and we're saving
a place for you!

Our regular schedule
10:30 am
Nursery and toddler care provided
Sunday School for children
11:30 Fair Trade Coffee Hour

Evensong Service 
with Folk Ensemble

3rd Sundays @ 5:15 pm,
September through May.
Masks and physical
distancing are required.

Where to find us

900 Summit Avenue
Saint Paul, MN 55105

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St. Paul's UCC | Journeying together toward deeper faith, justice, and love for all   

900 Summit Ave, Saint Paul, MN 55105  |  651-224-5809  |  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  |  Our Facebook Page

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